Tag Archives: Boston Beer Co.

Boston Beer Co. Designs New Can for Its Samuel Adams Brew

Boston Beer Co. Samuel Adams prototype beer can

Traditional beer can and prototype Samuel Adams can (right)

Craft-beer watchers have seen numerous respectable breweries can their beers during the past few years, after Oskar Blues Brewing Co. proved that cans do not necessarily negatively affect the taste of beer. (Last month, I wrote about Ballast Point Brewing Co.’s decision to can one of my favorite IPAs, Sculpin.)

The Boston Beer Co. and its founder Jim Koch have strongly resisted the whole craft-beer-in-a-can movement, but the company has apparently come up with a brand new can design, and it will release Samuel Adams beer in cans “in time for beach cooler weather,” according to Boston.com.

From Boston.com:

“The two-year effort cost more than $1 million, including the hiring of a renowned design firm and professional beer consultants, as well as the purchase of expensive canning equipment…

“The hourglass curve [or the can] and wider lid deposits the beer further in the mouth so a drinker doesn’t have to tilt his head back…

“The bigger lid forces people to open their mouths wider, allowing more air to pass through and go up into the nasal passages. This increased exposure to the smells brings out the flavors of the beer — the hops, the grains, the fruitiness — earlier in the drinking experience, which is what consumers associate with a fresher beverage…the outward-turned lip pours the beer directly on the palate, maximizing the sweetness from the malt.”

Personally, I don’t really care if my beer comes in a bottle or a can because I don’t think cans affect taste. I also almost always pour my beer into a glass. But cans clearly have a number of advantages over bottles; they’re lighter; they don’t shatter or break; they’re easier to carry in bulk for recycling; and they take up less space and are stackable. These reasons and more are why so many brewers today are canning their beer instead of bottling. And its nice to see another craft-beer pioneer embrace aluminum cans because it means Sam Adams will be served in more places, in venues that may not welcome glass bottle, such as sporting arenas.

UBN

via Boston.com

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Spread Holiday Cheer with Artisan Chocolate and Sam Adams Beer

Samuel Adams Beer Lover's Chocolate Box

The Boston Beer Co, makers of Samuel Adams beer, and artisan chocolatier TCHO.com, yesterday announced their Samuel Adams Beer Lover’s Chocolate Box, which costs $16.95, and comes with a dozen 8-gram chocolate squares and no beer—the Sam Adams is sold separately.

From a related press release:

“The Brewers at Samuel Adams worked closely with TCHO’s Chief Chocolate Maker Brad Kintzer to design the gift box so that each premium chocolate pairs with a Samuel Adams brew from the Samuel Adams Winter Classics Variety Pack. Just in time for holiday festivities and gifting, this assortment of specialty chocolates will prove to any foodie that beer and chocolate are the perfect combination.”

If you’re interested, you should act fast; the first 150 orders ship with two Sam Adams “perfect pint” glasses.

You can order your Samuel Adams Beer Lover’s Chocolate Box or find more information on TCHO.com.

UBN

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Happy 23rd Birthday, Samuel Adams Winter Lager

Samuel Adams Winter Lager

Growing up in Massachusetts and being the beer nerd that I am, I’ve always had an affinity for Samuel Adams and the Boston Beer Co. Back in the late 1990s, when I was in high school and I first started paying attention to the beer I was drinking, I quickly took notice of how Samuel Adams Boston Lager was different than any of the fizzy yellow piss beer most people brought to parties. Whenever somebody showed up with a 12 pack of “Sammys” instead of the usually 30 pack of Bud Light or MGD, other beer-conscious partygoers would swarm the dude with the Sam Adams in an attempt to trade a few cans of crap beer for a bottle of Boston Lager. I think that’s when my love affair with craft beer started. In fact, Sam Adams Boston Lager was probably the first “good beer” I ever drank.

I’m honestly not a huge fan of Samuel Adams Winter Lager—I much prefer the Boston Beer Co.’s Octoberfest and Summer Ale seasonals to Winter Lager. But the first bottles of Winter Lager shipped 23 years ago today, according to the Samuel Adams Twitter feed, so I’m wishing Winter Lager a happy beer birthday.

UBN

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Samuel Adams Octoberfest Milkshake is a Frosty, Frothy Abomination

Samuel Adams Octoberfest Milkshake from Red Robin

Must we fast-food-ize everything that is good and pure, America?

If the new Samuel Adams Octoberfest Milkshake from burger-chain Red Robin is any indication, the answer is, yes, absolutely.

Starting today and lasting through November 11, Red Robin customers will be able to purchase a Samuel Adams Octoberfest Milkshare, which is made with soft serve ice cream, Samuel Adams Octoberfest draft beer, vanilla and caramel.

From a Red Robin press release:

“A sip of this one-of-a-kind shake will rouse a round of toasts and solve one epic food dilemma, right up there with coffee or tea, onion rings or French fries, and soup or salad. The Octoberfest Milkshake offers a sweet solution – a milkshake and beer – in, one satisfying drink.”

Seriously? Has anyone ever truly craved both a craft beer and fucking milkshake? I’ve heard of Guinness floats, and though I haven’t actually had one, I could see how they might be tasty, or at least interesting. I honestly don’t have any inclination at all to try an Octoberfest Milkshake, and because there isn’t a Red Robin within 20 miles of the city of Boston, I don’t think I’ll get the chance to in the next month anyway.

What a terrible way to treat a fine craft beer. I can’t imagine that Jim Koch is very pleased with the idea.

Visit Red Robin’s website for more information.

UBN

(Image credit: Reuters)

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Boston Beer Co. to Release $160, 29% ABV Samuel Adams Utopia 2012 in October

Samuel Adams Utopia 2012 from the Boston Beer Co.

The Boston Beer Co. will reportedly release the latest entry in its specialty “Samuel Adams Utopias” line of ridiculously-high-ABV brews in October.

Here’s a quick description of the Sam Adams Utopias series, from the Boston Beer Co:

“The history of Samuel Adams Utopias comes from the extreme beers of [Sam Adams] Triple Bock and Millenium [sic] that came before it. With those brews we began the exploration of aging beer in barrels for a different flavor contribution. With Utopias, we took that process to another level by introducing a variety of casks that the beer was aged in, each offering their own unique flavor…. Samuel Adams Utopias has been brewed in three small limited batches to date, growing stronger with each batch. The first batch which was released in 2001 topped out at 24%ABV, for the fourth batch in 2009 we reached 27%ABV. Each batch was only released once in limited quantities.”

Despite the above information from the Boston Beer Co. website, WashingtonPost.com says the first Utopia brew from the Boston Beer Co. was released in 2002, and the 2012 version is meant to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the first Utopia release. I’m not sure what to believe, but The Post’s information seems to make sense, considering it has an image of a bottle that reads “Utopias 10th Anniversary,” and “Cheers to 10 years!” (See above.)

Release details aside, the 29-ish% ABV 2012 Samuel Adams Utopia will come in a ceramic bottle that’s meant to look like a brew kettle, just like the earlier Utopias, The Post says. The 2012 Utopia bottle with be black, however; past versions had coppery-golden bottles.

The brew is reportedly bronze-colored. It has little or no carbonation. And Boston Beer Co. Jim Koch told The Post the beer is different than past Utopia not only because of its higher ABV, but it’s also finished for several months in Nicaraguan rum barrels, “which added notes of ‘cocoa and fig’ and pushed it in a ‘sherrylike, oaky direction.'” Port and bourbon casks were also reportedly used to condition the brew.

The 2012 Samuel Adams Utopia will find its way into 15,000, 24-ounce bottles, and it will have a suggested retail price of $160, according to the report.

I’ve never had a Samuel Adams Utopia brew, and frankly, I don’t plan on dropping $160 or more for one any time soon, but that’s just me. Find more information on the Samuel Adams website.

UBN

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