Tag Archives: beer cans

Boston Beer Co. Designs New Can for Its Samuel Adams Brew

Boston Beer Co. Samuel Adams prototype beer can

Traditional beer can and prototype Samuel Adams can (right)

Craft-beer watchers have seen numerous respectable breweries can their beers during the past few years, after Oskar Blues Brewing Co. proved that cans do not necessarily negatively affect the taste of beer. (Last month, I wrote about Ballast Point Brewing Co.’s decision to can one of my favorite IPAs, Sculpin.)

The Boston Beer Co. and its founder Jim Koch have strongly resisted the whole craft-beer-in-a-can movement, but the company has apparently come up with a brand new can design, and it will release Samuel Adams beer in cans “in time for beach cooler weather,” according to Boston.com.

From Boston.com:

“The two-year effort cost more than $1 million, including the hiring of a renowned design firm and professional beer consultants, as well as the purchase of expensive canning equipment…

“The hourglass curve [or the can] and wider lid deposits the beer further in the mouth so a drinker doesn’t have to tilt his head back…

“The bigger lid forces people to open their mouths wider, allowing more air to pass through and go up into the nasal passages. This increased exposure to the smells brings out the flavors of the beer — the hops, the grains, the fruitiness — earlier in the drinking experience, which is what consumers associate with a fresher beverage…the outward-turned lip pours the beer directly on the palate, maximizing the sweetness from the malt.”

Personally, I don’t really care if my beer comes in a bottle or a can because I don’t think cans affect taste. I also almost always pour my beer into a glass. But cans clearly have a number of advantages over bottles; they’re lighter; they don’t shatter or break; they’re easier to carry in bulk for recycling; and they take up less space and are stackable. These reasons and more are why so many brewers today are canning their beer instead of bottling. And its nice to see another craft-beer pioneer embrace aluminum cans because it means Sam Adams will be served in more places, in venues that may not welcome glass bottle, such as sporting arenas.

UBN

via Boston.com

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Ballast Point Sculpin IPA in a Can

Ballast Point Sculpin IPA in a can

San Diego’s Ballast Point Brewing Co. is now canning its first beer, the popular Sculpin IPA, based on an image it posted on Facebook.

Sculpin has previously been available only in 12 oz. and 22 oz. bottles and on draft. Oskar Blues Brewing Co. started a craft-beer-can revolution when it decided to can all of its beer, proving that “good beer” can come in aluminum cans. And now that consumers are a bit more accustomed to seeing craft beer in cans, more and more brewers are doing the can thing.

Lots of beer nerds still prefer bottles over cans. (I’m one of them.) But cans do have their advantages. They’re smaller and stackable, so they take up less space and can be more portable. They don’t shatter. They’re lighter when they’re empty, making them easier to carry back to beer retailers for recycling. And they block out light, which can age beer quickly and decrease freshness.

UBN

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The $50,000 Beer Can

Gibbons Bock Beer Can

And I thought paying $1,000 or more for an iPhone was ridiculous.

Chicago-business-man Adolf Grenke, who has been pulling beer cans out of gutters and collecting them for more than 40 years, plans to auction off his entire collection of cans and vintage beer memorabilia starting tomorrow, and one of the most rare beer cans is expected to sell for somewhere in the range of $50,000.

From AntiqueToyWorld.com:

“[T]he Grenke collection includes as many as 500 highly collectible vintage beer cans. The can collection is regarded as one of the finest collections of its kind ever assembled, with some of the cans expected to sell for $20,000 to $60,000 each.

“The collection also includes over 400 beer taps – with many expected to realize more than $1,000 each – and a bevy of colorful advertising signs. Highlights include over 50 Gillco glass light-up signs, and two examples of late-19th-century Anheuser-Busch signs of such rarity that they are not even represented in the famed St. Louis brewery’s archive.”

The can that’s expected to pull in around $50,000, according to Dan Morphy, CEO of Morphy Auctions, the company that’s holding the auction, is a Gibbons Bock Beer can. Morphy says the Gibbons Bock can is “the most desirable of all bock beer cans.”

I’d rather have a can of Baxter Stowaway I.P.A.

UBN

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