Category Archives: Pale Ale

Sierra Nevada Gets New Website, Targets Outdoorsy Hipsters with Overproduced Video

Chico, California’s Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is doing a bit of rebranding, and it launched both a brand new website and an odd video about the history of the company to get the word out.

The website looks great, and the update was needed; Sierra apparently hasn’t updated its site in a decade. The video is cool, too…I guess. Sort of. But I have to ask, “Seriously, Sierra?” The clip is four minutes long and it’s packed with silly nature scenes and wildernessy, outdoorsman hipsters—outdoorsters?—who apparently love Mother Nature almost as much as they love a frosty Sierra Nevada.

I think the dudes at Sierra gave their ad guys the keys to the car, and they kind of just drove away with it here. Sierra Nevada played a huge role in the modern-day craft beer revolution in the United States, and it is still making great beer. That’s the message Sierra should be sending, not that its beer pairs nicely with adventure.

I drink a lot of Sierra Nevada beer, but I spend my days surrounded by concrete, bricks and glass, not rivers, sticks and grass. That video makes it seem like Sierra Nevada forgot about all the city-dwelling folks who are fueling the craft beer movement.

UBN

via MediaBistro.com

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Bathe in Brew with Dogfish Head Beer Soap, Shampoo

Dogfish Head Beer Soap and Beer Shampoo

I just took a shower and cleansed my filthy form with both beer soap and shampoo from Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. And I smell damn nice, if I don’t say so myself.

The Dogfish Beer Soap is made with the brewery’s “90 Minute Imperial IPA, saponified oils of palm, coconut, rice bran, olive, ground hops, barley, essential oils of lavender, rosemary and fir.” The Dogfish Beer Shampoo is made with “Dogfish Head Shelter Pale Ale, saponified oils of palm, coconut, rice bran, castor, essential oils of cedar, pine, spruce, rosemary and fir.” (The front of both labels say the products are made with 60 Minute IPA, but the ingredient lists on the backs says different.)

I feel comfortable reviewing beers on this blog, because I know my shit when it comes to craft beer. However, I’m no soap/shampoo expert, so I won’t even try to evaluate these Dogfish products. They sure do smell good, though, and I feel quite clean.

The soap and shampoo come in 3.5-ounce bars, and they cost $5 each. (The Dogfish Beer Shampoo is also apparently quite popular in the professional dog-grooming world, at least according to Dogfish Founder Sam Calagione’s book about the launch of his brewery.)

Dogfish isn’t the only beer company that makes beer soap, either. Brooklyn Brewery sells tins of beer soap for $10, and they contain three bars of soap made with different varieties of Brooklyn brews. Stone Brewing Co. sells a handful of different $6 soaps that use Stone beers as ingredients.  And The Beer Soap Co. offers a ton of different soaps made with beer ranging from Budweiser to Delirium Tremens.

You may not be able to swim in beer like the Boston Beer Co.’s Jim Koch. But it’s easy enough to bathe with it.

UBN

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Dogfish Head and The Grateful Dead Announce ‘American Beauty’ Pale Ale, Solicit Ingredient Ideas from Boozy Deadheads

Dogfish Head Grateful Dead American Beauty Imperial Pale Ale

Yesterday, Delaware-based Dogfish Head Craft Brewery announced a new collaboration between it and The Grateful Dead, the 60s jam band that just won’t quit. (I didn’t even know that any of those dudes were still alive until Phil Lesh and Bob Weir sang the national anthem at the Cardinals/Giants MLB NCLS game on Monday.)

From Dogfish Head’s website:

“Working in that happy place between creative ideas and like-minded people, the off-centered brewery and free-spirited band have been trading ideas for a beer they’re calling ‘American Beauty.’ They’ve settled on a strong pale ale with all-American hops and barley, and now they’re asking their loyal fans to suggest a special ingredient – and the Dead-inspired story behind it.”

The idea is for Deadheads to suggest ingredients that have some sort of Grateful-Dead-related sentimental value to them that would work well in a strong pale ale.

More from Dogfish:

“Did you trade a bushel of fresh clementines for tickets to a two-night-stand at Long Beach Arena? Or maybe your dad first laid eyes on your mom sipping a cup of green tea in the parking lot of the legendary Cornell ‘77 show? Jog your memory, tell the story, and suggest the ingredient at the heart of that story. You could help bring this counterculture collaboration to life.”

I’m not a Dead fan, and the only two Dead songs I can think of are Scarlet Begonias and Casey Jones. I guess the begonias could work as a beer ingredient, but I’m guessing Dogfish won’t want to use cocaine. Deadheads interested in offering up legitimate suggestions should check the Dogfish website in the future for additional details. The American Beauty beer is expected to be available on tap and in bottles in October 2013.

Dogfish Head and its Founder Sam Calagione have participated in quite a few collaborations recently, including Liquid Breadfruit, which it made along with Maui Brewing Co., and Rhizing Bines, which it’s in the process of making with Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. The brewery has worked with other brewers on limited release beers for years, but it seems like Dogfish is ramping up its collaboration efforts.

For more on Dogfish and Calagione, read “5 Funky Facts I Learned about Dogfish from Founder Sam Calagione’s Business Book” and “Sam Calagione on the Difference between Beer Snobs and Beer Geeks.”

UBN

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Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Mustard is a Perfect Pretzels-and-Beer Companion

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale & Honey Spice mustard with pretzels

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is one of an increasing number of craft breweries trying to capitalize on the popularity of craft beer by releasing culinary products made with beer. (Last week I reviewed Stone Brewing Co.’s Double Bastard Ale: Double Burn Habanero hot sauce, and earlier this month I spotlighted Brooklyn Brine’s Hop Pickles, which are made with Dogfish Head 60 Minute IPA.)

Sierra Nevada makes three different kinds of mustard: Pale Ale & Honey Spice; Porter & Spicy Brown; and Stout & Stoneground mustard. I found a bottle of the Pale Ale and honey mustard at my local craft beer shop, and today I used it as a dipping sauce for my favorite Uncle Henry handmade pretzels.

The Sierra Nevada pale ale mustard is very mild; in fact, it’s more sweet than spicy, thanks to the honey. It would be a great sandwich topping, since it’s not overpowering. Like most of the “beer-flavored” products I’ve had, the mustard doesn’t really taste like beer. But it is quite good, and I definitely recommend it.

Sierra Nevada trio of mustards

I paid $4 for my 9-ounce squeeze-bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale & Honey Spice, but it, along with the other two styles of Sierra mustard, is available directly from the company for $3.75 a bottle, plus shipping. Eight-ounce glass jars of each mustard style are also available from Sierra Nevada for $3.50. And you can buy a “gift pack” of all three mustards for $14.00, plus shipping.

UBN

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