Category Archives: Imperial Pale Ale

Bathe in Brew with Dogfish Head Beer Soap, Shampoo

Dogfish Head Beer Soap and Beer Shampoo

I just took a shower and cleansed my filthy form with both beer soap and shampoo from Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. And I smell damn nice, if I don’t say so myself.

The Dogfish Beer Soap is made with the brewery’s “90 Minute Imperial IPA, saponified oils of palm, coconut, rice bran, olive, ground hops, barley, essential oils of lavender, rosemary and fir.” The Dogfish Beer Shampoo is made with “Dogfish Head Shelter Pale Ale, saponified oils of palm, coconut, rice bran, castor, essential oils of cedar, pine, spruce, rosemary and fir.” (The front of both labels say the products are made with 60 Minute IPA, but the ingredient lists on the backs says different.)

I feel comfortable reviewing beers on this blog, because I know my shit when it comes to craft beer. However, I’m no soap/shampoo expert, so I won’t even try to evaluate these Dogfish products. They sure do smell good, though, and I feel quite clean.

The soap and shampoo come in 3.5-ounce bars, and they cost $5 each. (The Dogfish Beer Shampoo is also apparently quite popular in the professional dog-grooming world, at least according to Dogfish Founder Sam Calagione’s book about the launch of his brewery.)

Dogfish isn’t the only beer company that makes beer soap, either. Brooklyn Brewery sells tins of beer soap for $10, and they contain three bars of soap made with different varieties of Brooklyn brews. Stone Brewing Co. sells a handful of different $6 soaps that use Stone beers as ingredients.  And The Beer Soap Co. offers a ton of different soaps made with beer ranging from Budweiser to Delirium Tremens.

You may not be able to swim in beer like the Boston Beer Co.’s Jim Koch. But it’s easy enough to bathe with it.

UBN

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I Haz Heady Topper, Motherfuckers

Heady Topper Double IPA by the Alchemist Vermot

At this moment, I’m drinking a Heady Topper from The Alchemist brewery in Waterbury, Vermont. And it’s amazing, which is why I’m dedicating a blog post to a single 16-ounce can—yes, it comes in a can—of beer.

Heady Topper is an double IPA, but it’s not just any IPA. It’s probably one of the best, and most sought-after IPAs in the United States right now. It’s the Pliny the Elder—or maybe even the Pliny the Younger—of the East Coast. And it’s made in smaller batches than Pliny, so it’s incredibly difficult to get your hands on, even in New England. (I find Heady Topper once every few months, and I go to embarrassingly great lengths to find rare beers.)

The Heady Topper can screams, in capital letters, “DRINK FROM THE CAN!” But fuck that. This beer deserves better—and I admittedly have a can complex.

From the Heady Topper can:

“Heady Topper is an American Double India Pale Ale. This beer is not intended to be the biggest or most bitter. It is meant to give you wave after wave of hoppy goodness on your palate. Tremendous amounts of American hops will creep up on you, and leave you with a dense hoppy finish in your mouth. So

“So drinkable, it’s scary.

“Sometimes I wish I could crawl right into the can. Freshness and control have always been my main concern when it comes to our beer. We are committed to providing you with an unfiltered and unpasteurized hop experience. Why do I recommend that you drink it from the can? Quite simply, to ensure a delightful, hoppy experience. The act of pouring it in a glass smells nice, but it releases the essential hop aromas that we have worked so hard to retain. If you MUST pour it into a glass you may find that some of the hop resins have settled to the bottom—leave them in the can when pouring. This beer is perishable, and at its best when it’s young, fresh and hazy. Keep it cold, but not ice cold. Drink this beer immediately, we are always making more.

–  John Kimmich, The Alchemist, Waterbury Vermont”

Heady Topper is near the top(per) of my list of IPAs every hopeless hop head should try at least once. I just finished my can, and I’m already pining for another. That’s some heady shit.

UBN

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Dogfish Head and The Grateful Dead Announce ‘American Beauty’ Pale Ale, Solicit Ingredient Ideas from Boozy Deadheads

Dogfish Head Grateful Dead American Beauty Imperial Pale Ale

Yesterday, Delaware-based Dogfish Head Craft Brewery announced a new collaboration between it and The Grateful Dead, the 60s jam band that just won’t quit. (I didn’t even know that any of those dudes were still alive until Phil Lesh and Bob Weir sang the national anthem at the Cardinals/Giants MLB NCLS game on Monday.)

From Dogfish Head’s website:

“Working in that happy place between creative ideas and like-minded people, the off-centered brewery and free-spirited band have been trading ideas for a beer they’re calling ‘American Beauty.’ They’ve settled on a strong pale ale with all-American hops and barley, and now they’re asking their loyal fans to suggest a special ingredient – and the Dead-inspired story behind it.”

The idea is for Deadheads to suggest ingredients that have some sort of Grateful-Dead-related sentimental value to them that would work well in a strong pale ale.

More from Dogfish:

“Did you trade a bushel of fresh clementines for tickets to a two-night-stand at Long Beach Arena? Or maybe your dad first laid eyes on your mom sipping a cup of green tea in the parking lot of the legendary Cornell ‘77 show? Jog your memory, tell the story, and suggest the ingredient at the heart of that story. You could help bring this counterculture collaboration to life.”

I’m not a Dead fan, and the only two Dead songs I can think of are Scarlet Begonias and Casey Jones. I guess the begonias could work as a beer ingredient, but I’m guessing Dogfish won’t want to use cocaine. Deadheads interested in offering up legitimate suggestions should check the Dogfish website in the future for additional details. The American Beauty beer is expected to be available on tap and in bottles in October 2013.

Dogfish Head and its Founder Sam Calagione have participated in quite a few collaborations recently, including Liquid Breadfruit, which it made along with Maui Brewing Co., and Rhizing Bines, which it’s in the process of making with Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. The brewery has worked with other brewers on limited release beers for years, but it seems like Dogfish is ramping up its collaboration efforts.

For more on Dogfish and Calagione, read “5 Funky Facts I Learned about Dogfish from Founder Sam Calagione’s Business Book” and “Sam Calagione on the Difference between Beer Snobs and Beer Geeks.”

UBN

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